Inspiring Genealogy Blogs – October 2012

October has passed and once again I have found a whole bunch of Inspiring Genealogy Blogs posts that I’d like to share with you.

I don’t know about you, but I definitely find that reading blog posts helps me keep up with the latest news, products and what’s happening in general in the world of genealogy. And if you happen to already follow me on Twitter, and to some extent Google+, you already know that I like to share with you the interesting things I read.

Anyway I hope you find the following Genealogy Blogs … Inspiring.

The Demise of Books?
In this post Marian Pierre-Louis tells us about a post that she heard which said that the South Koreans were at the forefront of using digital textbooks, and their  goal was to be completely digital by 2015. As well the US Secretary of Education also wants to go digital. He said, “Over the next few years, textbooks should be obsolete.” She asks the questions what ramifications does this mean for the publishing industry if the next generations of children grow up without holding printed books in their hands? Will the publishing industry have to go completely digital?  Read the full story …

Meet the Camera Man—An Inside Look at How Historical Documents are Being Digitally Captured
If you have you ever wondered where all the images on familysearch.org come from, and who are the people behind the cameras, and how do they do their work? You’ll not want to miss this one. Read the full story …

Research Tools and the Death of Genealogy
A recent comment from a reader in relation to WikiTree now being reopened to member registration, was that “The joy of the genealogy hobby is in the discovery. People in the future won’t get to experience this because their genealogy will already be done and freely available on sites such as WikiTree.” This is looked at in more detail. Read the full story …

Ignorance: The Biggest Threat to Family History
I was thoroughly intrigued by this post by Thomas MacEntee. He writes that “for all the blog posts, websites, books and media stories about how to scan your photos and documents, how to preserve items using sound archival practices, etc., what the genealogy community needs to confront is the damage done by ignorance.” And goes on to say about the closure of archives, or the restriction of records is because of ignorance. Read the full story …

Can you use Pinterest for Genealogy?
Pinterest is the one of the newest social networking websites, but has grown rapidly into one of the most popular sites. The basic concept is similar to a bulletin board, where you can post pictures that remind you of things you are interested in learning about or buying. It is heavily oriented towards fashion, food and home decorating. Most Pinterest users organize their pins by having multiple boards. If you are using Pinterest for genealogy related items, you can create one or more family or genealogy boards. For example, you could create a board for a particular ancestor or surname. Read the full story …

Has the Internet Replaced the Genealogical Society and the Archive?
John D. Reid from the Anglo-Celtic Connections picked up on a topic that was discussed on the Genealogy in Canada blog “Why Belong to a Genealogy Society” building on the results of the results of the Canadian Genealogy Survey. In the post’s final paragraph we learn this … “Most of the respondents to the survey indicated that archives were seldom used and genealogical societies were not seen to be very relevant. Instead, new-age genealogists are smitten with the on-line resources without troubling to think about where those records come from.” Read the full story …

Letters Sent from Nazi Labor Camp Delivered 70 years later
While not technically a blog, this article on Yahoo News caught my eye, and tells the story that spans generations and continents, and involves a man sent to a Nazi labor camp in World War II, his family back in France, and an antique letter collector in the United States who reunited the lost notes with the family. Read the full story …

Webinars and Webcasts
James Tanner reminds us that sometimes those of us in the genealogy industry need to go back a step to explain genealogy and technology terminology to those who are just beginning. Read the full story …

How to Write a “Cousin Bait” Genealogy Post
Amy Coffin refers to it as cousin bait because it’s a lot like fishing. You do a little work to get your line ready, then you set it in the water and wait for a bite. If you have your own genealogy blog (or other online tool) it’s very easy to cast your own genealogy fishing lines. Here are some tips on writing effective cousin-bait blog posts. Read the full story …

Do you Have a Right to Take Photographs in Cemeteries?
Written by Judy G. Russell, the Legal Genealogist -  do you have the right to take photographs in cemeteries is one that is of great importance to any genealogist, and as you can see from all the comments left on her blog post, has created quite a controvery. Read the full story …

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