Inspiring Genealogy Blogs – May 2013

Inspiring Blogs 300 My list of Inspiring Blogs that I read during May is a tad late, but better late than never, as there’s a heap of great reading in this lot. This time we have everything from why you should blog to find your ancestors, to lessons Gen Y can teach you, to how to organise your genealogy, and even one on etiquette. So quite a range! Continue reading →

WikiNorthia: Documenting Melbourne’s North

 After asking our staff who knew about WikiNorthia, and getting a unanimous “no”, I’ve decided that this site needs to get more attention than it does. So let me introduce you to it. Firstly WikiNorthia is a website (a wiki in this case) that is all about documenting life, history (and the present) of everything to to do with Melbourne’s north. Continue reading →

Inside History Magazine – Issue 16 (May-Jun 2013) is Out Now

 Inside History Magazine Issue 16 is available now and this one is their Irish issue and in it you’ll … discover the best Irish resources online and on site; how to find your convict in the newspaper; learn about the lives of famine orphans; read about the experiences of Irish assisted immigrants in the 1800s; see what our ancestors got up to during St Patrick’s Day celebrations, plus a whole heap more … Continue reading →

A New Project to Digitise Country Victoria Records

 Victoria’s history sits on 9km of shelving in the PROV’s repository at North Melbourne. The problem is, these records are hundreds of kilometres away from the folks in country Victoria, so aren’t easily accessible. Now Archival Access Victoria has come up with a Project that will help everyone. Their plan is to digitise these records for country Victoria … Continue reading →

Kelly Family 175th Anniversary Reunion

 A third Kelly family reunion is planned to mark the 175th anniversary of the arrival of William and Jane Kelly in South Australia. William Kelly (1804-1888) and his wife Jane (1819-1893), left the Isle of Man in July 1838 for South Australia, where they arrived on 1 December 1838. They came soon after to what became Cudlee Creek … Continue reading →