Highlight: London Life in the 18th Century

 This book on CD gives a great insight into how people lived in London in the 1700’s and one which later historians have often consulted as a reference in their own works. It covers just about every conceivable subject including life and death, housing and growth, immigrants and emigrants, people and trades, parish children and the uncertainties of life, plus much, much more. Continue reading →

2.5 Million New British Criminal Records Go Online

 The latest BIG addition to Findmypast is 2.5 million British criminal records which are now online for the first time ever! This collection of historical “Crime, Prisons & Punishment records” is simply amazing, and will give you information that you will not find elsewhere. And now that they are online can you imagine just how many people worldwide are going to uncover any villains or drunkards lurking in their family trees. Continue reading →

Warby Family Reunion, 24 March 2013

 As family historians we love family reunions, don’t we! So let me tell you about the Warby Family Reunion that is coming up later this month. The reunion is for the descendants of John and Sarah Warby (nee Bentley), and will be on Sunday 24th March 2013 at 12.00pm-4.00pm, at Glenalvon, 8 Lithgow Street, Campbelltown, New South Wales. If you’re a reli come and meet your cousins. Continue reading →

Honour Your Anzacs with Findmypast.com.au’s Anzac Memory Bank

 Anzac Day is coming up on April 25th, and Findmypast.com.au are are asking those with Australian or New Zealand military ancestors to join them in honouring your Anzacs and the sacrifices they made for their country. They are creating an Anzac Memory Bank to honour and remember the brave men and women who fought for their country. It includes not only those that lost their lives but also the brave men and women who made it home. Continue reading →

The Australian WWI Records Finder, an All-In-One Search

 I recently found out about the ‘Australian WWI Records Finder’, which comes from the creative mind of Tim Sherratt from Wragge Labs. Now the beauty of the Australian WWI Records Finder is that it searches the National Archives of Australia (NAA), the Australian War Memorial (AWM) and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) all with the one search. Sounds good doesn’t it! Continue reading →