Inspiring Genealogy Blogs – July 2014

Inspiring Blogs 300Although I was away for a large portion of July on Unlock the Past’s 5th Cruise, I still managed to do a whole lot of blog reading, and have found more inspiring and awesome posts that I want to share with you.

In this July edition we cover everything from genealogy-related activities to do in Summer, books every genealogy library should have, name variants, copyright on microfilm,  querying goals vs strategies, killing off your ancestors and a bunch more.

I know that I’ve mentioned before (each time) that I find that reading blog posts helps me keep up with the latest news, products as well as what’s happening in general in the world of genealogy. And if you happen to already follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and to some extent Google+, you already know that I like to share with you the interesting things I read.

Five Genealogy Things to do this Summer
Written for our friends in the northern hemisphere who are have currently taken all of our summer warmth, leaving us a cold, wet winter. But trust me, summer will eventually come. And Lisa Alzo gives some great suggestions on what to do on those lovely warm summer days. Read the full story …

Building a solid genealogy library (part one)
Every researcher’s personal library will be different, but a solid library should almost always contain these five types of works. Read the full story …

Name Variations: Tips and Tricks
Findmypast have written a great article on name variants. You might have name variants because of name changes, nicknames, alternate spellings of names, abbreviations and of course transcription errors. The more you learn about variants, the better equipped you will be with your searching. Read the full story …

Am I Defined by One Action?
How many times have you done something that might seem rather random, or out of character. But when put into context it all makes sense? I think we all have at some stage. Helen Smith covers this topic on the Worldwide Genealogy blog. She starts off by saying that “As family historians we want to tell the story of our ancestors, to bring them to life and to add personality to the names and dates and this is a laudable desire.” Which then leads on to being ethical about what you tell, as well as telling things in context. Read the full story …

Genealogy Goals vs Strategies
I love this post by Valerie of the “Genealogy With Valerie” blog. I think she’s nailed it by saying that everyone who jumps into genealogy has a goal – we all want to find out what we can about our ancestors as far back a s we can. BUT, how many of you have a research strategy? Read the full story …

What is the relationship of bloggers to genealogy?
Not a day goes by when there aren’t new genealogy blogs started? If you don’t believe be check out Thomas MacEntee’s www.geneabloggers.com website. In this post James Tanner poses this very interesting question. Read the full story …

What is a source? What is proof? Why do we care?
James L. Tanner’s Genealogy’s Star gets another mention with this post. He starts off by saying that “Genealogical proof is a sticky subject. I have been writing recently about my opinions on the relationship of both legal and scientific proofs systems to genealogy and why I think that it is unfortunate that the terminology for both are imposed is a mistake. But that leaves the issue of the relationship of sources to genealogy and what we call the information derived from our historical investigation.” Read the full story …

Killing Them Off – It can help knock down those brick walls
As researchers we all learn about “killing off our ancestors” don’t we? In this post that Hilary Gadsby wrote for the Worldwide Genealogy blog, she talks about researchers not utilising all the possible records to do just that, as they can provide very valuable clues. To quote Hilary “Finding out when and how someone died can bring so much to your story and without a record of death how can you be sure that there was not some other reason why that individual has apparently disappeared.” Read the full story …

Copyright and Microfilm
Judy Russell’s “The Legacy Genealogist” seems to make it into my Insipiring Blogs list mor often than not, and that’s because she comes up with such amazing posts like this one. A reader asked her who owns the copyright of the images on a microfilm? Interesting question isn’t it? Read the full story …

Happy reading, and all the best with your continued research!

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