Inspiring Genealogy Blogs – August/September 2013

Inspiring Blogs 300Welcome to yet another edition of “Inspiring Genealogy Blogs”. I must apologise as due to the busyness of things I actually missed doing the August one, so decided to hold it over and just do both August and September together.

So bear with me as there are a few, but if you have the time each one is really worth reading.

Once again we have a real mix of topics, with everything from ethics, to ages in records, how to protect your photos from ageing, using Google Maps and Google Earth legally, artificial brick walls, the English and Welsh census and more …

I know that I’ve mentioned before (each month) that I find that reading blog posts helps me keep up with the latest news, products as well as what’s happening in general in the world of genealogy. And if you happen to already follow me on Twitter, and to some extent Google+, you already know that I like to share with you the interesting things I read.

Anyway I hope you find the following Genealogy Blogs … useful, and well, inspiring.

Living with Family Heirlooms
Sarah from the Genartistry blog gives us ideas on how those heirlooms that are stored in boxes can with a little creativity, can be incorporated into any home decor. But not only that, in doing so this can inspire less-enthusiastic family members to ponder and appreciate their ancestors. Read the full story …

Ethical Dilemmas #1
Gen from the GenXalogy blog tells us about a “whole new ethical issue which I haven’t really seen people write about: handling heirlooms.” Being the keeper of family heirlooms does come with  a number of responsibilities, and a whole bunch of questions. Read the full story …

Your Photos Don’t Have to Disappear–So Soon
Dick Eastman originally wrote an article titled Your Photos May Disappear, after that Gary W. Clark of PhotoTree.com wrote a response, which Dick Eastman posted. In this Gary tells us that like many, he has experienced the issue described by Dick Eastman, in that he used a inkjet printer to print photos which have since faded. So he gives us good solution for long-lasting prints. Read the full story …

The same age as my tongue, and a bit older than my teeth
I discovered this wonderful post on The National Archives (UK) blog. And it discusses ages, or the supposed ages of people. And how you’ll find many references to them in historical records, not to mention how important they are to a  genealogist. But there is a lot of inaccuracy out there, as many of us discover very early in our research, and there are all sorts of reasons for this, and they don’t all involve dishonesty. Read the full story …

Archiving JPG Scans and Photos from Your Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner, Digital Camera, and Mobile Phone
We all do it, take pictures on your phone, digital camera, or even usual your scanner. But how do you make these pictures archive quality as they all save in JPG format rather than TIFF? There are some blogs that I seem to visit on a regular basis, and Denise’s The Family Curator is one of them. In this post she covers JPG vs TIFF, and she has a bunch of solutions for this very problem. Read the full story …

Serious Thoughts to Quit Blogging
The author of the my Heritage Happens blog writes about her thoughts on quit blogging. Judging from the Archives on her blog she’s been blogging since at least 2008, and has been quite a busy bee. But why this sudden change of heart? And what has she done about it. Read the full story …

Finding Ancestor Records Directly from FamilySearch Family Tree
Written by Dennis Brimhall, the CEO of FamilySearch, and here he tells us about the new search function on FamilySearch Family Tree that is one of the most effective new tools that FamilySearch has ever created: search records within an ancestor page in FamilySearch Family Tree. Read the full story …

House Numbering in the UK
The British Postal Museum & Archive have written a post to answer a common question “when did house numbering start in the UK?” Read the full story …

Terms of Use: Google Maps & Earth
Are you a user of Google Maps and or Google Earth? Have you ever copied maps or images from them? If so, take a moment to read this fascinating response from Judy, The Legal Genealogist to a query that was sent to her. Read the full story …

Do You Have an Artificial Brick Wall?
Brick Walls … we all say we have them, but how many of them are actually “artificial brick walls’, or “self-imposed brick walls’. Robyn’s Reclaiming Kin post on this really grabbed my attention, and is certainly worth a read. Read the full story …

Creative Thinking for Genealogy
Jen asks us what do dog licenses, water permits and bawdy houses have in common? They are all resources that can – and should – be utilised in genealogy. Read the full story …

Is there a “Right” To Do Genealogy?
This was another of those “had-to-read-because-of-the-title” posts, to see just what it was all about. Thomas said it all started with someone’s comment “What right do I have to poke around in these records? I sometimes think about how my grandparents would react if they knew I had information on many aspects of their lives such as their age, when they were married, etc. What would they say to me if they were still alive” Read the full story …

The census and future provision of population statistics in England and Wales
Ok, this isn’t a blog post, but it is a link to a page that talks about the options that are possibilities in the way future English and Welsh censuses are taken. It was said that the 2011 Census was going to be the last of it’s kind, and this appears to be true. Read the full story … 

Till mt next post, happy reading, and I wish you all well with your continued research! And remember a negative result when searching is STILL a result.

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